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Little guguluf

Little guguluf


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Servings: -

Preparation time: less than 15 minutes

RECIPE PREPARATION Little guguluf:

Put the yeast in a bowl for 30 minutes with a little milk and a little flour. Then melt the butter and mix with the eggs in another bowl, add the yeast, sugar and salt and mix well. Leave this crust to rise in a warm place for 30 minutes. After it has risen, grease the forms with butter and put a little crust on it and bake it. After baking, leave it to cool a bit and make a syrup from it. the above ingredients and syrup each guguluf then garnish with liquid chocolate, candies and put a little whipped cream in the middle. Have fun!


Here's how easy it is to make these little culinary gems!

We break the eggs in a bowl, sprinkle salt and sugar over them and mix them until they become frothy. Then add the cottage cheese, drained of liquid and mix the composition.

We pass the washed and pitted peaches through a blender, together with half the amount of yogurt.

In the other half of the amount of yogurt, turn off the baking soda and add it over the egg and cheese composition.

Add the peach puree with yogurt, essence, oil and again mix the composition. Then, incorporate the sifted flour together with the baking powder.

The resulting composition should be the texture of a cream and leave to rest for about 15 minutes, during which time the oven is heated to 180 degrees.

We fill with this composition about 3/4 of the capacity of the muffin and mini guguluf shapes and we stick 6-7 blueberries from place to place, at each one.

Then put them in the oven for 30-35 minutes, at 180 degrees.

Let them cool, powder them with sugar and serve them with gusto, with your loved ones.




You can also follow my recipes on the page Facebook, but I'm waiting for you with culinary surprises and on Instagram.


  • 3 eggs
  • 100 gr butter
  • 300 gr of flour
  • 7 gr baking powder
  • 250 gr mascarpone
  • 75 ml milk
  • 200 gr sugar
  • 250 gr nutella
  • a pinch of salt
  • powdered sugar for decoration (optional)

Beat the eggs with the sugar and a pinch of salt until they become foam. Add the melted butter, mascarpone, milk and finally the flour mixed with the baking powder.

Transfer a quarter of the composition to another bowl and mix it with nutella.

In a guguluf shape greased with butter and lined with flour we put alternately from both compositions according to imagination.

Bake for 35-40 minutes at 180 ° C in the preheated oven. Turn the cake over and, when it has cooled completely, sprinkle powdered sugar.

Good job and good appetite!

If you find yourself in the taste of the recipes on this blog, we are waiting for you every day and on facebook page. You will find there many recipes posted, new ideas and discussions with those interested.

* You can also sign up for Recipes group of all kinds. There you will be able to upload your photos with tried and tested dishes from this blog. We will be able to discuss menus, food recipes and much more. However, I urge you to follow the group's rules!

You can also follow us on Instagram and Pinterest, with the same name "Recipes of all kinds".


Reader Interactions

Comments

HI Olguta, I & # 8217m so in love with what you & # 8217re creating. Are you Romanian? I can see your recipes are written in Romanian but I just wanted to check. Because I & # 8217m part Romanian and it & # 8217s exciting for me to see that.
I will be attempting to recreate some of your recipes, and so pleased i came across your site.
by Olguta.

If the icing is too thin, add more orange juice, if it is too thick add more powdered sugar. I think you wrote them in reverse :))))

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Guguluf with poppy seeds and egg liqueur

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees with heat from above and below. Wallpaper the baking tin with butter and flour. Beat the eggs with the powdered sugar and vanilla sugar until you get a fluffy texture. Pour the vegetable oil and egg liqueur slowly into the egg composition with sugar, stirring constantly. Mix the flour with the cornstarch, gray poppy seeds and baking powder and add them to the liquid composition. Mix until a fine dough is formed. Pour the composition in the form of wallpapered baking.

Place the pan in the middle of the oven for about 45 minutes. (Test with a toothpick!) Then take it out of the oven and let it cool in the oven. Turn the hood over when it has cooled.

Sprinkle with powdered sugar before serving.

Tip: If you want to decorate it with icing, you need egg liqueur. Mix 200 g of powdered sugar with 3-4 tablespoons of liqueur and spread the mixture over the guguluf.


. NINA'S RECIPES.



7 comments:

how good this recipe for summer.
bss.

wow those r some gorgeous clicks.

So good in a cucumber boat!

dear nina very good salad. see you.

First of all I apologize for having you so abandoned, I did not update your tickets.
But it's already fixed.
This recipe is ideal for the time we are in, so I'll give you a copy.
A kiss Nina

His blog has caught our attention for the quality of his recipes.

We would appreciate it if you could register it on Ptitchef.com so that we can index it.

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How a Food Blog Shaped the Way We Use the Internet

To review this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

To review this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

When Epicurious launched in 1995, there were few websites on the Information Superhighway where you could find recipes for chocolate cake and shrimp scampi. There were very few websites, period. The Internet was an infant, crawling ever so slowly (remember dial up?) Into our lives.

Jump forward two decades, and my, how things have changed. Epicurious is thriving, and so much faster, too. The site (which, like WIRED, is owned by Condé Nast) turns 20 this week, which in Internet years makes it old enough to get an AARP membership card in the mail.

But as they say, with age comes wisdom, or at least some hard-earned lessons. Epicurious just published a massive oral history of its origin story, and it offers some fantastic When I was your age moments that remind us of what life was like on the Internet in the mid-90s. Which is to say barely working, and a little lawless. As Kevin Slavin, a first-hire designer at the online magazine and now a professor at MITâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s Media Lab, remembers it, & quotIt was clear, not in a bad way, that nobody knew what they were doing, including me. We were going to make this up. ”

That uncertainty was in many ways a blessing. Without a definitive guidebook dictating how to design for the web, Slavin and his colleagues (including art director Mark Michaelson) were more or less free to create a website from scratch, exactly the way they wanted to. Itâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s a freedom echoed in other accounts of the early web: With no rules to abide by, you made them up as you went along.

With that in mind, I sifted through Epicurious & # x27 oral history to reveal some of the most enlightening bits.

Today, most websites follow basic navigational rules, but in the early days of the web, typical website architecture was non-existent. Epicurious designed its website like a tabloid. It looked like a newspaper with clickable links. Slavin says this wasn & # x27t a nod to a familiar format but an effective way of presenting and organizing a ton of information. Hyperlinks were still a challenging concept — can you just click on that? And why were they blue? This was years before best-practices crystalized into user-interface givens.

At that point, I thought, & quotYou have a homepage. What else is there? & Quot To get the architecture through my head, Kevin would spread big pieces of white paper on the ground and crawl around drawing and saying, & quotThis goes to here, and then you have to go back to here. From every page, you need to be able to do this and this. & Quot —Mark Michaelson, former art director

Mark wasnâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; t designing by looking at the web. He was basically designing a tabloid, beautifully, better than anyone else could have designed a website. My role was figuring out how to translate that vision. —Kevin Slavin, former designer

It was so limited. The Internet was mostly ASCII text. An Internet designer was really like an icon designer, designing little envelopes and little symbols. I was very frustrated, because I wanted to do glorious designs. It seemed like everything we wanted to do was pushing it a little too far, and we had to pull it back. —Mark Michaelson

And then there was the whole content thing. You couldn & # x27t just upload your words to Wordpress and click publish. In the early days, getting content online was a manual process. Perhaps the most mind-boggling nugget from oral history is that a group of cybermonks (WIRED wrote about them in 1996) was responsible for digitizing much of the early webâ & # x20AC; & # x2122; s content.


CHANGES TO ENERGY EFFICIENCY CLASSES

What is changing in energy efficiency classes?

It's quite simple: the usual "Plus" classes, such as A +++, A ++ and A +, are replaced by a uniform scale of energy consumption from A to G. The seven-step color scale is preserved. Due to the changed measurement methods, it is not possible to transform the old label into the new label, only approximate information being possible.

For now, the changes will not affect dryers, ovens and hotels. These will be reviewed starting in 2022. So it is very possible to find a class C washing machine next to an A +++ dryer.

With the new energy label, some new content is introduced:

A QR code will be found on all energy labels, which links to the EU product's EPREL database. Here you will find additional information about the energy label and product information sheet of that appliance.

Previous Plus classes (A +++, A ++ and A +) will no longer apply to the washing machine sector. Furthermore, the available energy efficiency class varies from A to G.

Currently, water and electricity consumption is no longer set on an annual basis, but on a single cycle, and respectively reported per 100 cycles.

New A-D classes are also introduced in terms of noise during squeezing, to make the sound level expressed in dB (A) clearer.

1. QR code
2. Energy efficiency class *
3. Weighted energy consumption * in kWh / 100 operating cycles (in the Eco 40-60 program)
4. Maximum load capacity
5. Duration of the "Eco 40-60" program in full load conditions
6. Weighted water consumption * reported in liters / operating cycle (in the Eco 40-60 program)
7. Squeezing efficiency class *
8. Noise emissions during the squeezing cycle, expressed in dB (A) re 1 pW, and sound emission class

* Values ​​apply to quarter, half and full loads.

As with all new energy labels, there will also be a QR code for the tumble dryer, which links to the EU product's EPREL database. There you will find additional information about the energy label and the technical data sheet of the respective product.

For the drying part of the washing machine, the available energy efficiency classes continue to vary from A to G.

The complete scheme of this product group will be reviewed. The washing and drying area and the washing area are displayed on their own scale, and the values ​​for them are indicated more clearly.

Currently, water and electricity consumption is no longer indicated on an annual basis, but per cycle or per 100 wash cycles.
New A-D classes are also introduced in terms of noise during squeezing, to make the sound level expressed in dB (A) clearer.

"1. QR code
2. Energy efficiency class ** (full duty cycle)
3. Energy efficiency class * (wash cycle)
4. Weighted energy consumption in kWh / 100 cycles (full operating cycle **)
5. Weighted energy consumption * in kWh / 100 cycles (wash cycle)
6. Maximum load capacity (full duty cycle **)
7. Maximum load capacity (wash cycle)
8. Weighted water consumption in liters / operating cycle (complete operating cycle **)
9. Weighted water consumption * in liters / operating cycle (wash cycle)
10. Program duration (complete operating cycle **) under full load conditions
11. Program duration "Eco 40-60" in full load conditions
12. Squeezing efficiency class *
13. Noise emissions during the squeezing cycle expressed in dB (A) re 1 pW and sound emission class "

* Values ​​apply to a quarter of the wash load, half and a full load. While washing and drying at half and full load.
** Washing and drying

As part of the standardization process, the previous "Plus" classes (A +++, A ++ and A +) have also been replaced for dishwashers with a uniform scale from A to G. According to the previous standard, the new energy efficiency class B corresponds approximately to an apparatus with A +++ -23%.

In the future, a QR code will be found on all energy labels, which links to the EU product's EPREL database. There you will find additional information about the energy label and the technical data sheet of the respective product.

Furthermore, new, more realistic requirements (eg large vessels) are introduced when specifying sets. Therefore, the values ​​here will now be different compared to the old energy label.
Currently, water and electricity consumption is no longer indicated by annual value, but by cycle or 100 wash cycles.
New A-D classes are also introduced in terms of noise during squeezing, to make the sound level expressed in dB (A) clearer.

1. QR code
2. Energy efficiency class
3. Energy consumption in kWh / 100 ecological operating cycles
4. Number of standard sets
5. Water consumption in liters / ecological operating cycle
6. "Eco" cycle duration
7. Noise emissions expressed in dB (A) re 1 pW and sound emission class

A QR code will also appear on the labels of refrigerators and freezers, which links to the EPREL database of the EU product. There you will find additional information about the energy label and the technical data sheet of the respective product.

The previous plus classes (A +++, A ++ and A +) will no longer apply to the cooling and freezing zone. Furthermore, the available energy efficiency class varies from A to G. The new energy efficiency class A corresponds to an appliance with A +++ - 60% according to the previous standard.

As before, electricity consumption is reported annually.
The new noise classes A-D are new and express more clearly the noise level in dB (A).

1. QR code
2. Energy efficiency class
3. Energy consumption in kWh / year (measured under new standard conditions)
4. Total volume of all ice cream compartments
5. Total volume of all non-freezing compartments
6. Noise emissions expressed in dB (A) re 1 pW and sound emission class

There will also be a QR code on the wine cooler labels that links to the EU product's EPREL database. There you will find additional information about the energy label and the technical data sheet of the respective product.

The previous plus classes (A +++, A ++ and A +) will no longer apply to the cooling zone. Furthermore, the available energy efficiency class varies from A to G.
As before, electricity consumption is reported annually.
Noise classes A-D are new and express more clearly the noise level in dB (A).

1. QR code
2. Energy efficiency class
3. Energy consumption in kWh / year (measured under new standard conditions)
4. Number of standard wine bottles that can be stored
5. Noise emissions expressed in dB (A) re 1 pW and sound emission class


The best meat marinade & # 8211 For a tender, tasty and juicy steak

Put all the marinade ingredients in a bowl and mix very, very well.

Put the meat in the marinade and refrigerate overnight.

Note: we can keep the meat in the marinade for a maximum of 2-3 days, in the refrigerator.

Fry the meat in a pan with a little hot oil.

Sprinkle sesame seeds on meat like frying.

Enjoy with gusto! Good appetite!


The 15 Best Steak Marinade Recipes on the Planet

The easiest and most amazing ways to elevate any cut of meat.

Unless you're grilling the finest and freshest Wagyu beef in your backyard on a routine basis, chances are you're cooking with meat that could use just a little helping hand. Fortunately, the right steak marinade can help you elevate any slab of beef by tenderizing it and infusing it with loads of extra steak marinade flavor at the same time.

So whether you’re grilling, pan-frying, broiling, searing, Pittsburghing, sous-vide-ing, or even slow-cooking, here are the best steak marinade recipes that are guaranteed to make your dinner turn out a whole lot better when it's done. And remember: whatever steak marinade you choose, all of them call for marinating the steaks between two and four hours before cooking. (However, the longer you let it marinate, the more flavor your steak will have. We recommend doing it overnight, if you can.) And for expert cooking tips, here's how to cook a steak at home like a pro.

The Classic Italian Steak Marinade

This simple balsamic vinaigrette – based marinade is ideal if you're looking for a lighter flavor to add to a thick porterhouse steak. Inspired by the classic Fiorentina steak dish from Florence, Italy, this steak marinade won't overwhelm the flavor of the meat, but will help accentuate it.

What You Need

  • One 3-pound bone-in T-bone steak, about 4 inches thick
  • 1 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped rosemary
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons ground pepper
  • What To Do

Combine the vinegar, olive oil, and rosemary in Ziploc bag. Add the steak, seal the bag and refrigerate overnight, turning the bag several times.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Remove steak from marinade and season with salt and pepper. Discard marinade. Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan. Grill the steak about 5 minutes on each side, until lightly charred on both sides.

Place the steak on a baking sheet and roast for about 30 minutes, until the internal temperature of the tenderloin section reads 125 degrees.

Transfer the steak to a carving board and let it sit for 5–10 minutes. Use a carving knife to slice it across the grain and serve.

The Lemon-Garlic Combo Steak Marinade

Lemon and garlic can make for a terrific combination, blending into a mouth-wateringly complex flavor. This is a great one, that hits citrusy notes with a kick of spice from the red pepper flakes.

What You Need

  • Two 6-ounce bone-in ribeye steaks
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt

Combine olive oil, lemon juice, lemon zest, minced garlic, red pepper flakes, and sea salt, as well as steaks, in a sturdy Ziploc bag.

Marinate in fridge for 2-4 hours.

Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan. Grill the steak about 5 minutes on each side, depending on the thickness of the meat.

The Soy Sensation Steak Marinade

Soy sauce is a solid base for a wide range of steak marinade recipes (as you’ll see from the others on this list), bringing rich, salty and savory undertones to the meat. With this marinade, you can leave the steak sauce on the shelf.

What You Need

  • Two 8-ounce boneless steaks (sirloin works well)
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 lemon, squeezed, with seeds removed
  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 tablespoon dried basil
  • 2 tablespoon dried parsley flakes
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder

Combine all ingredients, including steaks, into a sturdy Ziploc bag and mix well.

Remove steak from marinade and discard marinade. Grill on medium-high for about 5 minutes on each side.

The Savory Ginger Soy Steak Marinade

Ginger goes great with soy when creating a steak marinade, particularly if combined with something to add a bit of sweetness — honey, molasses, or hoisin sauce, for example (sugar can always work too, in a pinch). This recipe comes from The New York Times'Mark Bittman, who is not a big advocate of long marinating times and says it's "ideal for steak, but it works beautifully with any tender meats like burgers, boneless chicken, tuna and swordfish, all of which can be turned in the sauce before putting them on the grill. "

What You Need

  • One 16- to 24-ounce boneless steak (rib-eye, skirt or strip), or one 24- to 32-ounce bone-in steak (rib-eye or T-bone)
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon minced ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 tablespoon honey, molasses, or hoisin sauce
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • Juice of 1/2 lime

Mix together the marinade ingredients to taste and add more of anything you like.

Turn the steak in the sauce once or twice, then let sit in the sauce until the grill is hot. (If you prefer to let your steak marinate for longer, consider combining all ingredients into a Ziploc bag and putting in the refrigerator for up to 4 hours prior to grilling.)

Start a charcoal or wood fire or heat a gas grill the fire should be hot and the rack no more than 4 inches from the heat source.

Turn the steak one more time, then place on the grill spoon any remaining sauce over it. For rare meat, grill about 3 minutes a side for steaks less than an inch thick. For larger or more done steak, increase the time slightly.

The Korean-Style Steak Marinade

If you've ever been to Korean barbecue and tried the bulgogi, you can appreciate how flavorful this sweet and savory dish can be. Though that's usually made with short ribs, it can work great on steaks, too. Here's a recipe from celebrity chef and James Beard Award winner Michael Symon that does just that.

What You Need

  • 4 1/3-inch thick slices strip steak
  • 3 tablespoons ginger, finely grated
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons Sriracha sauce
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • For serving: 2 limes, cut into wedges 1/2 bunch cilantro, leaves picked

Combine the ginger, brown sugar, soy sauce, garlic, sesame oil, Sriracha, and olive oil in a bowl and whisk to combine. Add the beef and cover with plastic wrap. Let marinate for a few minutes to as long as one hour.

Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan. Remove the meat from the marinade and place on the grill, cooking 1 to 2 minutes per side. Remove from the grill.

Serve the strip steaks with lime wedges, cilantro and Sriracha.

The Vietnamese-Style Steak Marinade

Southeast Asia offers its own delicious flavor elements that work great in a steak marinade, including fish sauce — yes, fish sauce. This sauce, popular in Vietnamese cooking, comes from fermented fish, as its name implies. It might not taste great on its own, but neither does Worcestershire sauce (which is itself made of fermented anchovy). But when incorporated into a savory steak marinade, balanced with garlic, ginger, and brown sugar, it’s pretty amazing.

What You Need

  • 16 ounces skirt steak
  • 3 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon minced ginger
  • 2 teaspoons brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • Sunflower or canola oil
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper

Combine the fish sauce, lime juice, garlic, ginger, and brown sugar into a sturdy Ziploc bag. Taste to be sure it’s not too salty, and add more sugar or lime juice if so. Place the steak skirt in the marinade and seal the bag. Let it marinate in the fridge for at least 30 minutes.

Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan. Set the steak on the grill and cook for 3–5 minutes on each side, until both sides have a good char. Slice the steak across the grain and serve, adding a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Cuban cuisine is rich with citrus, cumin, and spices. This steak marinade goes well with strip steak and a tropical salad (and maybe some Buena Vista Social Club on the radio)

What You Need

  • 24 ounces boneless sirloin strip steak
  • 2 tablespoon McCormick Grill Mates Montreal Steak Seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1-1 / 2 teaspoon oregano
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/4 cup of orange juice
  • Juice of 1/2 fresh lime
  • grated lime zest

Combine the marinade ingredients together in a bowl. Add the steak and turn, coating both sides.

Refrigerate a minimum of 30 minutes.

Heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high in grill pan. Grill the steak for about 4 minutes on each side, until meat is as well done as you prefer. Slice and serve.

The Chipotle Adobe Steak Marinade

For rich flavor with a serious spiciness, you can't do much better than chipotle chilis — with a big assist from the adobo sauce it comes soaked in. This recipe leverages both of these delicious ingredients.

What You Need

  • 16 to 24 ounces of beef flank steak
  • 1/3 cup fresh lime juice
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons chipotle chilies, minced in marinade sauce
  • 2 tablespoons marinade sauce
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon lime peel, freshly grated
  • Leap

Mix the marinade ingredients in small bowl, combining thoroughly, and place in a Ziploc bag with the steak. Turn steak to coat and refrigerate marinating steak for 6 hours or more.

Heat grill pan to medium high, adding a dollop of olive oil. Remove steak from marinade and discard marinade, placing steak on pan about 5 minutes on each side (or slightly less or more, depending on how you prefer it). Thinly slice across the grain on the diagonal and serve.

This one's probably a bit different than steak marinade recipes you've used in the past. Papaya naturally tenderizes tough meat fibers through an enzyme in its skin, while also adding a natural flavor to it. This recipe just requires the papaya skins, but don’t let the fruit go to waste — a fresh papaya salad goes great with this marinated steak.

What You Need

  • 28 ounces flank steaks or skirt steaks
  • 2 skins from medium ripe papayas (should still have 1/8 inch of papaya flesh intact)
  • 2 scallions, minced
  • 1 tablespoon dry mustard
  • 1 teaspoon minced thyme leaves
  • 3⁄4 teaspoon fresh ground pepper
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

In a mixing bowl, stir scallions, mustard, thyme, pepper, ginger, and cumin. Rub the mixture evenly over the steak.

Put 2 of the papaya skin halves in a glass baking dish, flesh side up. Place steak on top of them, then top with remaining 2 papaya skins, flesh side down. Be sure the skins are touching the meat's surface — that's what will break down the fibers to effectively marinate

Cover baking dish and refrigerate for 2 hours or more.

Heat grill pan to medium high.

Discard papaya skins and lightly oil both sides of steak, seasoning with salt. Grill the steak about 5 minutes on each side. Carve the meat across the grain into thin slices and serve.

The Red Wine Steak Marinade

Red wine goes great with steaks — but not just as an accompanying beverage. The subtle flavors of the wine actually make it a terrific ingredient for a steak marinade, and one that goes particularly well with a well-marbled tri-tip steak. Here's the recipe.

What You Need

  • 2 ½ pound tri-tip steak
  • 2/3 cup red wine (go with a nice mid-shelf wine — not dirt cheap, since the flavor will come through, but don't waste the really good stuff)
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh garlic, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper

Combine the marinade ingredients into a Ziplock bag, mix well and add the steak. Marinade for 6 hours or more (it's a big piece of meat, so longer will help ensure more flavor gets through). Remove meat from refrigerator and lest sit at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Preheat outdoor grill for high heat, lightly oiling the grate. Place the meat on the preheated grill, cooking for about 4 minutes, then flipping, repeating this every 4 minutes until the beef firms up and appears to be a juicy reddish-pink in the center (usually about 25 to 30 minutes). It should read 130 degrees on an instant-read thermometer.

Let sit for 10 minutes, then slice and serve.

The Dijon Kick Steak Marinade

This recipe will give your steak a nice Dijon-spice kick, incorporating rosemary and crushed red pepper to create a really satisfying combination of flavors.

What You Need

  • 2 24-ounch hanger steaks, trimmed
  • 4 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 3 cloves garlic, smashed and finely chopped
  • 2 rosemary sprigs, picked and finely chopped
  • Juice and zest of 1 lemon
  • Pinch crushed red pepper

Combine the Dijon, garlic, rosemary, lemon juice and zest, and crushed red pepper into a bowl, fully mixing them. Place steaks in the bowl, fully coating them with the marinade. Cover and place in the fridge for at least two hours (though overnight would be even better).

Preheat the grill. Remove steaks from refrigerator and remove from steak marinade. Season the steaks with salt but hold on to the marinade.

Brush and oil the grill. Place the steaks on a hot spot on the grill and brush them with the excess marinade, moving steaks out of the flame if there is a flare up. Grill for 4 to 5 minutes on each side for medium rare (longer for more well done). Remove the steaks from the grill and let them rest for 5 to 10 minutes before slicing. Slice and serve.

The Herb Magic Steak Marinade

This herb-heavy recipe gives a nice light flavor to your steak, and works best with a thicker cut, like a porterhouse. The apple cider vinegar rounds out the flavors nicely.

What You Need

  • 2 16-ounce porterhouse steaks
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 sprigs of thyme
  • 6 sprigs of rosemary
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 teaspoons of ground black pepper

In a mixing bowl, combine oil, soy sauce, vinegar, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, pepper, and mustard, stirring for 1 to 2 minutes. Add onion, garlic, thyme, and rosemary to the bowl, mixing well.

Put marinade into large Ziplock bags, adding steaks and ensuring they are covered completely.

Place bag (s) in refrigerator for 4 to 6 hours — turning once or twice.

Remove meat from bag. Discard the sprigs of thyme and rosemary. Season steaks with kosher salt.

Prepare a charcoal or gas grill with coals or heat on medium-high. Brush both sides of the marinated steak with olive oil and sprinkle with garlic and herbs. Grill the steaks, turning at least once, cooking until meat reaches desired doneness. Slice and serve.

The Garlic Special Steak Marinade

Some guys love garlic, some hate it. During dates and romantic evenings, it's probably best avoided, but for a hearty night of steak at home, you'd do well to make friends with the bulb. Here's a simple, delicious recipe that will allow you to do just that.

What You Need

  • 2 16-ounce rib-eye steaks
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, smashed and coarsely chopped
  • 15 sprigs fresh thyme leaves
  • Coarse salt and pepper

In a mixing bowl, combine oil, garlic, and thyme. Add steaks, making sure to completely coat. Cover dish and refrigerate at least 1 hour or as long as overnight. Turn steaks a few times if marinating overnight.

Prepare grill, lightly oiling grates. Remove steak from marinade and season with salt and pepper, discarding marinade. Place steak on grill, and cover, turning once, until meat is desired doneness (12 to 16 minutes should get it to medium-rare).

The Rich Tomato Steak Marinade

Here's another excellent marinade option that incorporates red wine, but goes even more hearty by making tomato sauce part of the flavor.

What You Need

  • Two 8-ounce boneless steaks
  • 2 teaspoons of thyme
  • 1 cup of Worcester sauce
  • I cup red wine
  • 1 cup tomato sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

In a mixing bowl, combine the Worcester sauce, wine, and tomato sauce, as well as the salt, thyme, and chili peppers. Fully mix and add the steak, coating completely and refrigerate for at least an hour.

Remove steaks, remove excess steak marinade and pan grill about 5 minutes on each side or longer, depending on your preferred level of doneness.

Pour the marinade into a sauce pan. Bring to a boil and simmer until reduced by half. Serve over the finished steaks.

The Sweet and Savory Steak Marinade

Brown sugar is a great option when marinating, particularly when complemented by soy sauce and Worcestershire sauce. The three work together brilliantly and give the meat a deep, satisfying flavor.

What You Need

  • 1 cup soy sauce
  • 2 pounds ribeye steak
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce
  • 4 teaspoons brown sugar
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced

In a mixing bowl, combine all marinade ingredients and mix. Add steak and stir to coat. Marinate 6 hours to overnight.

Prepare grill, lightly oiling grates. Remove steak from steak marinade and season with salt and pepper, discarding marinade. Place steak on grill, and cover, turning once, until meat is desired doneness (12 to 16 minutes should get it to medium-rare).

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