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Celebrities’ Favorite Sun-Drenched Getaways

Celebrities’ Favorite Sun-Drenched Getaways


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Where the A-list goes to escape wintry weather

From Capri to Cabo and the Maldives to Miami, Hollywood’s stars know just where to go to get away from it all in fabulous style. And they don’t let a little thing like weather get in the way of year-round holidays to domestic and exotic destinations. Celebrities like Katy Perry, Penélope Cruz, and Leonardo DiCaprio find winter sun in some of the world’s most beautiful and popular paradise-like destinations. The difference between their holiday and yours is simply that they combine that beach paradise location with nearly unattainable sumptuous lodgings.

Click here to see the Celebrities’ Favorite Sun-Drenched Getaways Slideshow.

Some power players like George Clooney may go the private villa route when planning their sun-filled vacations, but plenty of stars book into exclusive and pricey suites in some of the world’s most luxurious hotels. One of the world’s most beautiful couples, Gisele Bündchen and Tom Brady, have been photographed on more beaches than we can count, but they recently jetted to Rio de Janeiro’s shores for a lavish stay at the Copacabana Palace. Fellow supermodel Kate Moss found time to sun-worship in the Southern Hemisphere while on safari in South Africa, and Jennifer Aniston has been known to lounge by the sparkling infinity pool at Las Ventanas al Paraiso in Los Cabos, Mexico. And earlier this year, guests at the Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea had to wait in line behind Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez at the breakfast buffet.

While we’re sure there are a few celebrities who love a snowy holiday — we’ve seen a few brave A-listers skiing down slopes and piling on warm layers — for the most part, Hollywood’s rich and famous can be seen sunbathing on the sand and playing in the bright blue sea. So where are their choice spots for warming up in the winter sun? Read on for 12 celebrities’ not-so-secret sunny escapes.


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


Chef Renee Erickson Shows How to Grill Dungeness Crab at Home

Renee Erickson

Renee Erickson's Most Recent Stories

Photo: courtesy Jim Henkens

Over the last decade, Renee Erickson has emerged as one of Seattle’s preeminent chefs and restaurateurs. Her knack for delicious food in beautifully designed spaces has let her branch out across the city with concepts that draw inspiration from some of her favorite places in the world. There’s her ode to Rome at Willmott’s Ghost, the Parisian wine bar vibes of Bistro Shirlee, the Pacific Northwest cuisine-driven The Whale Wins and more. For her new cookbook Getaway: Food & Drink to Transport You, she channels the best eating and drinking of her favorite places too, dividing the book into sections devoted to those locales. For the recipe she’s sharing from the book, she looks to her own backyard by showing you how to grill up Dungeness crab.

Related Stories

My dad, Jim Erickson, is a major reason I see food as an adventure. He loves harvesting food from the wild. Especially crabs! I grew up eating crab we caught all together in the Salish Sea. A lot of crab. So much that I remember getting a little tired of eating crab: crab toast, crab omelet, crab quiche, cold crab and mostly crab melts. These days, I don&rsquot get to go crabbing as often, and so I&rsquom completely ready to dig into a crab any time I have the chance. I especially love the smoky fragrance that comes when buttered crab hits a hot grill. I like to garnish it with big fennel blossoms that bloom all over Seattle roadsides and parking lots in the middle of the summer&mdashlovely blooms and extra fennel fragrance all at once. (If you are really industrious, you can dry your own fennel blossoms and sift out their pollen so you don&rsquot have to splurge on the Italian stuff. But for mere mortals, order some from World Spice or Zingerman&rsquos, and know that you will have profound flavoring power in that spendy little jar.)


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